Week 7 Drawing

Highlighting pattern while reading Brown (2020)

Similar to week 6, I also tracked my highlighting pattern while reading Brown (2020) paper. Each vertical line represents a page, and a 3-colour system was employed for my highlighting:

  • Green: key ideas
  • Red: ideas where I found a tangible connection with my day-to-day practice
  • Blue: key terms I learnt in this paper

In conceptualising my data tracking exercise this week, I found I had practically designed myself a learning activity: to annotate Brown (2020) paper with the system prescribed. Me as a “teacher” prescribed a model way of reading – me as a student had to look out for key ideas, connect such ideas with my day-to-day practice and identify new terms; and the act of highlighting is endorsed as the official sign of engagement.

At a personal level, a teacher can look at this drawing and think that I have simply omitted “Data collection”, “Data analysis” and “Limitations”; identified almost no newly learnt keywords; and have managed to connect this paper to my day-to-day practice. A teacher may choose to nudge me if they see this deviated from their ideal way of reading this paper.

As mentioned in week 6, an aggregation of this data for a group of students allows “frequently highlighted text” to be highlighted for a paper. Imagine this feature is deployed to the e-reading app for the whole class, students could be nudged by the “frequently highlighted text” to pay extra attention in such parts of the text.

1 thought on “Week 7 Drawing

  1. Great to see you refining this visualisation idea Enoch.

    ‘Me as a “teacher” prescribed a model way of reading’

    This is a really great insight, and surfaces another way we might think about ‘teaching with data’ in this block. Rather than assuming a practice in which teachers are ‘informed’ by student data, we might see data tracking as designed, not necessarily as surveillance (in the sense of, ‘what exactly are my students doing’), but rather as a pedagogical exercise that conveys good learning practices. Data tracking becomes the routine through which ‘positive’ behaviours are encouraged. I like that idea! One might even link these metrics directly with assessment criteria – such a visualisation wouldn’t be used to decide whether the student *had* addressed the criteria, rather only to encourage the behaviours through which they might be addressed. I suppose that the one caveat might be that the data tracking takes on too much emphasis, to the detriment of the (hopefully deep) reading.

    ‘A teacher may choose to nudge me if they see this deviated from their ideal way of reading this paper.’

    Perhaps. Although, at least seeing that ‘this student is generally doing the right things when reading’ might be enough of an insight?

    ‘ Imagine this feature is deployed to the e-reading app for the whole class, students could be nudged by the “frequently highlighted text” to pay extra attention in such parts of the text.’

    Nice idea. I also wonder if revealing ‘tangible connection[s] with … day-to-day practice’ would be useful too, by way of showing other students where they can connect ideas and theories to more concrete practices.

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