Week 5 Drawing

week 5 drawing

This week’s drawing I decided to collect qualitative data about my thoughts in reading the paper written by Eynon (2015). In reading the article, I employed a “thinking-out-loud” approach and recorded the thoughts I had, while logging the time points at which I had such thoughts. After the data collection, I developed 5 categories to describe my thoughts, and plotted them as a simple one-dimensional graph. This drawing may have a similar look to week 4’s drawing which aimed at visualising the pattern of my distraction while reading – the data collection method was very different.

On week 4, I employed simple logging by immediately categorising the distraction at the recording stage, resulting in data like “11:40 – non-work, 11:42 – data collection, 11:45 – data collection, 11:55 – work”.

However, for week 5, the data collection was descriptive, leading to data like “5:41 – am I sabotaging my reading by making my data collection this way? amused by myself; 5:44 – any way I can experiment with my data collection exercise?”. The categories were developed after reading through the data once.

2 thoughts on “Week 5 Drawing

  1. This is another excellent visualisation Enoch, offering a detailed analysis of your response to a specific reading – a really great idea for a ‘learning’ visualisation’.

    ‘I employed a “thinking-out-loud” approach and recorded the thoughts I had, while logging the time points at which I had such thoughts … The categories were developed after reading through the data once.’

    Interesting to see that you defined the categories after you had noted your thoughts. I suppose defining the categories before hand would have changed the result quite substantially. I wondered here how this kind of visualisation might interpreted in terms of a ‘correct’ or ‘better’ pattern – what is a ‘good’ result for reading Eynon 2015 (or indeed any other paper), and could one start to define models?

    ‘This drawing may have a similar look to week 4’s drawing which aimed at visualising the pattern of my distraction while reading – the data collection method was very different.’

    Indeed, and the focus is certainly different, with this one seemingly directed more towards your ‘on task’ learning activity, rather than ‘distractions’.

    • “I suppose defining the categories before hand would have changed the result quite substantially.”

      On hindsight, I think having set categories first would mean the data recorded would be immediately fitted against set categories, and whatever doesn’t fit those categories would either be stacked into a miscellaneous category (hopefully) or discarded immediately. That would still generate a selective bias given that I would be actively looking for the pre-defined categories.

      “I wondered here how this kind of visualisation might interpreted in terms of a ‘correct’ or ‘better’ pattern – what is a ‘good’ result for reading Eynon 2015 (or indeed any other paper), and could one start to define models?”

      I think so. At the national level we already have defined learning outcomes for different levels of students – like for a FHEQ level 6 (Bachelor’s degree) graduate we already expect them to be able to apply their knowledge and make critical evaluation, and FHEQ level 7 (Master’s) we expect them to be able to demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems etc… (not to be exhaustive here)

      So I would expect if institutes were to define models of ‘good’ patterns, they would have gone back to the learning outcomes for their own course as well as their respective national qualification framework.

      In fact, this exercise would probably not look too different from developing a rubric for marking reflective journals, except the activity / data collected would be more microscopic (e.g. real-time recording of reflections during each activity vs collective reflection after a group of activities), and they would have tried to calibrate the models using data collected. Then again, rubrics can also be ‘optimised’ or moderated using a collection of student essays 😛

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *