Week 3 Data Drawing

Data drawing for week 3

This is the data drawing I produced for week 3, visualising the timing of my activities within the Critical Data in Education (CDE) course, in the context of work and other commitments. The data were collected using multiple ways: Google Chrome history, Twitter history, Signal app history and by recall. The drawing paints a picture of how I fit the activities of CDE on top of my existing commitments (hence the placement of CDE activities on the top of the timelines) and significant transitions in my life (starting a new relationship!).

This drawing provides a broad overview on my overall well-being. It seems to show that I managed some balance between my work, study, relationship and family. It may suggest I am doing okay in terms of social wellbeing (e.g. staying in touch with family/friends, spending substantial amount of time communicating with my new girlfriend).

I felt this type of data collection exercise (i.e. time tracking) would be a good exercise for students’ wellbeing, providing students not only the information on how much time they have spent on studying, but also whether they have spent decent amount of time to maintain their social wellbeing.

8 thoughts on “Week 3 Data Drawing

  1. A really simple yet effective way to give a picture of your week. You do appear to be very occupied but also very organised.

  2. Really good work here Enoch. I think this visualisation gives such a clear sense of your week, and the clustering of activities in the evening conveys a sense of busyness and varied activity, especially compared to the simple elongated lines of your ‘work hours’. The contrast seems to say a lot about your day!

    I also liked that you included lots of other activities here – seeing friends, etc – and I wondered how important it was for you to incorporate these elements. Perhaps we need a broad sense of the variance and richness of our activity to really understand ‘learning’ and it’s wider context? This is maybe what you mean by focusing on ‘well-being’ here?

    You also did an excellent job of explaining your design choices:

    ‘The drawing paints a picture of how I fit the activities of CDE on top of my existing commitments (hence the placement of CDE activities on the top of the timelines) and significant transitions in my life (starting a new relationship!).’

    This really provides an important sense of *why* this visualisation is arranged out in the way it is, and what meaning this conveys for you.

    ‘The data were collected using multiple ways: Google Chrome history, Twitter history, Signal app history and by recall’

    Interesting that this is derived from some digital tracking. Do you think that influenced how you put this visualisation together? Do you think it would have been different if you ‘manually’ tracked your browsing and social media use? Also, some of this is ‘recall’, so does that mean this visualisation is a less reliable account of your week?

    • Thanks for the feedback, Jeremy.

      “I also liked that you included lots of other activities here – seeing friends, etc – and I wondered how important it was for you to incorporate these elements. Perhaps we need a broad sense of the variance and richness of our activity to really understand ‘learning’ and it’s wider context? This is maybe what you mean by focusing on ‘well-being’ here?”

      Admittedly I didn’t really think too much when I was lumping in all these parameters in this drawing. On further reflections though, I felt what happens to students outside the boundaries of physical / digital learning space is often blackboxed, when we attempt to make sense of students’ learning. For instance, while the presence of user’s digital footprints in learning management systems may tell us something about students’ learning, we most certainly cannot derive meanings out of the absence of log data. But we know those “external” factors heavily influence learning.

      For me personally, this data visualisation reminded me to set boundaries between my competing priorities, to ensure I strike a balance somewhere.

      “Interesting that this is derived from some digital tracking. Do you think that influenced how you put this visualisation together?”

      Yes I think so. the digital tracking for Twitter only allowed me to record the time at which I posted, but did not capture the time I spent on refining the Twitter posts. It is always a time-consuming process trying to condense my thoughts into 280 characters! Say if I manually track the time I take for each activities, I might be able to generate visualisations that are more quantitative.

      “Also, some of this is ‘recall’, so does that mean this visualisation is a less reliable account of your week?”

      Potentially. It was certainly the case for my practice drawing. Since ‘recall’ is impressionist is nature, it is only fitting I adopt a more impressionist / qualitative / ordinal scale approach for my visualisation.

      Though for week 3, I only used ‘recall’ for marking my dinner times at home, as well as my meet-ups. It was actually quite reliable for this particular drawing. My family generally make sure we start dinner at ~7pm and finish within 1 hour! I also mark all my appointments with friends on Google Calendar, so yes, digital means helped verify my recall as well.

  3. This visualization is worth a thousand words, Enoch!

    To tell you the truth, I also feel the temptation of tracking my week, but at the same time, I feel a bit apprehensive to discover that I devote too little time to my family and friends. Having these data now, do you feel like changing something or are you satisfied with the balance?

    • Thank you for your questions!

      I think in some way this drawing reflect some attitudes I have for work, that is considering to be a mundane part of my life. So I think it somewhat nudged me to be a bit more reflective in my day-to-day work. Personally I think I’m happy with the balance so far.

      On a more data-related note, I think a data visualisation always has a story to tell, and it calls for a response from its intended audience (1: to act on it; 2: to acknowledge it; 3. to deny it)

  4. Hi Enoch, Great visualisation! I agree, I think it shows you have a pretty good work/life/study balance in your life. I loved that you tracked some personal data and it looks like your new relationship is going really well 🙂

  5. Pingback: Commentary on the data visualisation task | Enoch Chan’s Data Visualisation Blog

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *